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5 days ago

Historic Atlanta
Please remember Historic Atlanta in your year-end donations. Every dollar helps us grow our active programs. Link in Bio ... See MoreSee Less
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1 week ago

Historic Atlanta
Please help us #saveatl by donating to Historic Atlanta (Link in Bio) ... See MoreSee Less
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1 week ago

Historic Atlanta
As Thanksgiving approaches, we want to express our gratitude for the engagement of our followers!May peace, kindness and grace be bountiful in the days to come. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Historic Atlanta
The fight continues to protect sacred Native American sites from the never-ending onslaught of development pressure. To mark #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth, we want to amplify the voices of Mekko George Thompson and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation as they struggle to save their traditional capital and ancestral burial grounds:--------------------"Like most Americans, I know where my people, and my family, are buried. And like most Americans, my religion and moral decency requires that I protect and preserve their final resting place.My family is from Hickory Ground. Hickory Ground is where we lived, died and carried out our Mvskoke religion for thousands of years. It was the capital of our Muscogee (Creek) Nation. And it is where we buried our most important political and cultural leaders. And my family.But then the Trail of Tears separated us from our home. We didn’t want to leave. We were forced to go. We had no choice. That’s when the trauma began; and it continues today.Recently, a group of people (claiming to be Native) came to Hickory Ground and dug up my family, placed them in trash bags and plastic bins, and stored them at a university to be studied. The federal agencies responsible for Hickory Ground’s protection sat back and did nothing. They allowed the desecration to happen.After exhausting all other options, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation has filed a lawsuit that seeks accountability for all parties who caused or allowed this tragedy to happen."--------------------*full op-ed link w/ video interview from Mekko Thompson: indianz.com/News/2023/08/07/george-thompson-the-plight-of-our-sacred-hickory-ground/ ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Historic Atlanta
The fight continues to protect sacred Native American sites from the never-ending onslaught of development pressure.To mark #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth, we want to amplify the voices of Mekko George Thompson and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation as they struggle to save their traditional capital and ancestral burial grounds:--------------------"Like most Americans, I know where my people, and my family, are buried. And like most Americans, my religion and moral decency requires that I protect and preserve their final resting place.My family is from Hickory Ground. Hickory Ground is where we lived, died and carried out our Mvskoke religion for thousands of years. It was the capital of our Muscogee (Creek) Nation. And it is where we buried our most important political and cultural leaders. And my family.But then the Trail of Tears separated us from our home. We didn’t want to leave. We were forced to go. We had no choice. That’s when the trauma began; and it continues today.Recently, a group of people (claiming to be Native) came to Hickory Ground and dug up my family, placed them in trash bags and plastic bins, and stored them at a university to be studied. The federal agencies responsible for Hickory Ground’s protection sat back and did nothing. They allowed the desecration to happen.After exhausting all other options, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation has filed a lawsuit that seeks accountability for all parties who caused or allowed this tragedy to happen."--------------------indianz.com/News/2023/08/07/george-thompson-the-plight-of-our-sacred-hickory-ground/#savehickoryground #oceopofv #historicpreservation ... See MoreSee Less
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1 month ago

Historic Atlanta
As LGBTQ+ History month comes to a close this Halloween, we wanted to highlight one of the more interesting LGBTQ+ historic spaces highlighted in the Atlanta LGBTQ+ Historic Context Statement that sometimes features some wild outfits.“The circa 1925 bungalow located at 1714 Adolphus Street NE was known as the Funtone USA World Headquarters, which brought the first weekly show with LGBTQ+ representation on Atlanta television in 1981 with The American Music Show. The show was a public access program broadcast in Atlanta and created by Dick Richards, James Bond, and Potsy Duncan. Richards’ house on Adolphus Street in the Candler Park neighborhood became the Funtone USA World Headquarters with the living room serving as the main studio for the show. The American Music Show televised the experiences of members of Atlanta’s queer arts and music scene through interviews, recordings of live performances, and sketches and segments filmed on location, which depicted the late-twentieth century landscape of LGBTQ+ Atlanta. The cast also developed a roster of reoccurring characters, many of whom often appeared in drag, including the Singing Peek Sisters. With a budget of $5 per episode and using mostly home video equipment, The American Music Show broadcast queer culture into the homes of people across Atlanta, and eventually the country. The American Music Show ran on public access television through 2005.” If you like fun, whacky, and informative old-school videos, we highly recommend you take a look at the work of Funtone USA, especially those featuring Deaundra Peek!Photo and quoted text credited to New South Associates, Inc.#historicatlanta #saveatl #lgbtq🌈 #Media #lgbtqmedia #lgbtqspaces #landmark #pride #atlanta #candlerpark #funtone #americanmusicshow #publicacesstv #historic #bungalow #deservetopreserve #historical #Mediahistory #counterculture #LakeClaire #NPUN #historicpreservation ... See MoreSee Less
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1 month ago

Historic Atlanta
Happy Friday! Today, we wanted to share with you a brief history of one of our favorite "holdout" properties in midtown that luckily still stands - Bulldog and Company aka Bulldogs!Bulldogs, also known as Bulldog & Company, is located in Midtown Atlanta and by the 1990s became one of the more prominent spaces in Atlanta for Black gay men to gather and the last LGBTQ+ establishment still operating on Midtown’s Historic Gay Strip developed in the 1970s. It is unique as the oldest remaining LGBTQ+ bar still operating in its original location. Michael Clutter and Jerry Psyzka opened the bar as Bulldog & Company in 1978. The business originally had a trucker theme that was targeted toward the city’s masculine Levi/leather/western LGBTQ+ subcultures. Shortly after it opened, Bulldog & Company was recognized by Cruise as “one of the most unique bars in the country.” As part of the theme, the bar was decorated with the logos of trucking and gas companies, as well as truck tires, wheel rims, and road maps. It also had a large truck cab attached to the exterior of the building (no longer extant), and the owners housed a living bulldog mascot named Winston. Bulldog & Company remained popular with the mostly Atlanta that first catered specifically to white gay men, then during the 1990s to serving to Black gay men.It also has a case study in the recently completed LGBTQ+ Historic Context Statement. Check it out!#historicatlanta #saveatl #black #lgbtqspaces #Lgbtq #landmark #pride #atlanta #downtownatl #lgbtqatlanta #bulldogs #nationalregister #lgbtqspaces #historic #deservetopreserve #historical #socialhistory ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Historic Atlanta
This month, we’re going to continue highlighting historic LGBTQ+ places and spaces in the recently completed Atlanta LGBTQ+ Historic Context Statement: Next up: The Hammonds House MuseumThe Atlanta University Center and the neighborhoods that surround it, including West End and Vine City, developed into an LGBTQ+ enclave as early as the 1960s. Young Black LGBTQ+ people, particularly Black gay men attending Morehouse College, created social groups on the campuses of Atlanta’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which also extended to off campus residences in the area. Between the 1960s and 1980s, a mostly hidden enclave of Black LGBTQ+ life thrived in the area, occupying dorm rooms, private homes, and one of the city’s most well-known Black gay clubs, the Marquette Lounge at 809 Hunter Street NW, which has since been demolished and club relocated to 868 Joseph E. Boone Boulevard NW where it is still in operation today.Few Black Atlantans openly identified as LGBTQ+ prior to the late 1980s, and the visibility of Black gay life in the city was minimal before this time. Private social clubs that met in this area, such as the Atlanta Committee, created space for Black LGBTQ+ Atlantans during this period. Between the 1960s and 1970s, middle-class Black gay men who were not publicly open regarding their sexuality formed the Atlanta Committee. Members of the social club regularly hosted gatherings in their homes, including Dr. Otis Thrash Hammonds, who moved into his West End home at 503 Peoples Street SW, now known as the Hammonds House Museum, in 1979. The Hammonds House Museum is the only residence previously utilized as a meeting place for the Atlanta Committee that was identified during this study. 📸 @newsouthassoc #historicatlanta #saveatl #savelgbtqatl #lgbtq🌈 #pride #lgbtq #historical #atlanta #deserve2preserve #westend #nput #architecture ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Historic Atlanta
This month, we’re going to highlight some of our favorite places in the recently completed Atlanta LGBTQ+ Historic Context Statement. First up: WRFG!“WRFG 89.3 FM was created in 1973 as a progressive radio station with programming dedicated to giving avoice to communities that were denied access by mainstream stations. They also created space intheir programming for music genres that were not represented on other stations in Atlanta. Along with many other underrepresented groups served by WRFG, Atlanta’s LGBTQ+ communities were able to create programs that covered topics and issues important to them.Many of the founding hosts were lesbians, and a portion of the funding that supported the creation of the station was gifted to WRFG by a local LGBTQ+ woman. One ofthe first people to have a show on WRFG was ALFA co-founder Elaine Kolb, who began hosting “Lesbian/Woman” on the station in 1973. Other gay and lesbian shows on the station include Dave Hayward, Greg James, and James Moody’s late-1970s program “Gay Digest” and Maria Helena Dolan’s “Lesbian Lip Service,” which began airing in 1980. The station was located at1091 Euclid Avenue NE, now the popular L5P bar Elmyr, from its inception until the early 1980s, at which time it relocated to its current home as of 2023 at 1083 Austin Avenue NE. WRFG was one of the first media outlets to provide LGBTQ+ Atlantans with a platform to share their perspectives and disseminate important information to other LGBTQ+ people.”📸@newsouthassoc#historicatlanta #saveatl #pride #l5p #lesbian #gay #media #history #atlanta #lgbtqatlanta #little5points #wrfg #radio #inmanpark #50years ... See MoreSee Less
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3 months ago

Historic Atlanta
And just like that - the Atlanta LGBTQ+ Historic Context Statement is complete! Mayor Andre Dickens announced the completion of Atlanta LGBTQ+ Historic Context Statement on August 31st at the Mayors Annual Black Gay Pride Reception.The City of Atlanta’s history is rich, varied, and complex—reflective of the communities, events, and people that make it the thriving city it is today. Understanding Atlanta’s LGBTQ+ history is critical to fully understanding the city’s history. The context statement shows the LGBTQ+ community is an important part of that history.The context statement will facilitate the identification, documentation, and ultimately preservation of sites associated with Atlanta’s LGBTQ+ community. With this initiative, Atlanta joins major US cities such as Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Washington, DC in proactively documenting sites significant to the LGBTQ+ community.The City of Atlanta in partnership with Historic Atlanta was a recipient of a Certified Local Government Grant through the Historic Preservation Fund during the 2021 grant cycle for the purposes of creating this report.Read more at the link to the policy/planning workshop in our bio.#lgbtq #lgbtqhistory #historic #preservation #atlanta #saveatl #landmark #deserve2preserve ... See MoreSee Less
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